Food Shelf News

Food Shelf News

We celebrate this community-spirited generosity  – Thank you for the support this month from Michaela Ryan, farmer and founder of New Village Farm in Shelburne, who donated 50 pounds of ground beef.

Vermont Day School partners with Lake Champlain Chocolates on fair trade project

Vermont Day School partners with Lake Champlain Chocolates on fair trade project

As part of its annual spring tradition, Vermont Day School recently teamed up with a local business to create a real-world learning opportunity for its students. This year’s project was particularly sweet, as the Day School partnered with Lake Champlain Chocolates (LCC). 

Charlotte Senior Center News

Charlotte Senior Center News

It has returned! 

Anticipating spring here in Vermont is probably much like the ancients felt during a solar eclipse. There is always some subliminal doubt whether spring (like the sun) will really come back again. And now there is that delicate green haze in the trees from the budding leaves—which is as wonderfully fleeting as cherry blossoms.

Sunny Side Up – Ikigai

Sunny Side Up – Ikigai

Ikigai—such an interesting word, right? Loosely translated as “a reason for being” in Japanese, ikigai is where passion, mission, vocation and profession all intersect. It’s another way of thinking about what drives us, what provides meaning. I heard about ikigai from a Ted Talk, and it brought to mind a conversation I had with a college student about what provides meaning in his life. After my talk with the Charlotte dad who offered his take on his shifting and evolving thoughts on what brought meaning to his life, I wanted to hear what a young person, just launching into adulthood, would think about meaning and purpose.

Simple Summer Salads

Simple Summer Salads

School is almost out and June is just around the corner. The season of potlucks, barbecues and picnics is upon us. When “what can I bring?” was met with “how about a salad?” I used to silently protest. Salads are so…unglamorous. “How about a signature cocktail?” I would counter. “Oh. You can bring that too.”

Sports Report

Sports Report

With the seasons winding down, CVU spring sports have produced a couple of bumper crops among their teams. Women’s tennis stands out, having won all but one match by set scores of 7-0. The one match that did not measure up to perfection was, nonetheless, a 6-1 win over St. Johnsbury in the middle of last month. Senior Stephanie Joseph follows in her older sister Kathy’s footsteps as the number one singles player for the Redhawks (and, perhaps, the best in the state).

Vermont House of Representatives presents Clemmons family with  A Sense of Place resolution

Vermont House of Representatives presents Clemmons family with A Sense of Place resolution

Vermont state representatives Kiah Morris, D-Bennington, and Mike Yantachka, D-Charlotte, presented House Concurrent Resolution H.C.R. 364 to Dr. Jackson Clemmons and Mrs. Lydia Clemmons on Wednesday, May 2, in recognition of the Clemmons Family Farm’s A Sense of Place project,

Charlotte Library

Charlotte Library

Kids Programs & Activities

Thursday, May 17, at 3:15 p.m. THINK Tank: Cryptography. Learn the science of decoding messages and its importance in history. Solve some cryptography puzzles and create your own secret messages. For 4th-8th grades. Registration required. Please sign up for up to two THINK Tank programs in May. For more sessions, please request to be put on the waiting list.

Repair Café coming up!

Repair Café coming up!

Do you need something fixed? Transition Town Charlotte and our Hinesburg friends will be hosting our second Repair Café from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, May 19, at the Hinesburg Town Hall. A Repair Café is a community gathering where we come together to socialize and fix each other’s stuff. Why?

What musical language says that other language doesn’t

What musical language says that other language doesn’t

I have long been a fan of musical words. An attempted writer myself, I look for those people who can put meaning into language that often goes beyond what she or he thought of to put down on paper. I have said before, I favor Mark Twain, who once wrote that he never knew what he was going to say until he began to write it. 

Above the green and sturdy earth

Above the green and sturdy earth

   I turn 53 this weekend, the same age at which my mother’s mother died of breast cancer. I have heard of people dreading this kind of thing: arriving at the age at which a parent or grandparent died. I don’t feel that kind of fear or doom so much as a kind of sorrow, that I never knew my grandmother. We have so many ways to detect, diagnose and treat breast cancer now that my mother and sister and I have been able to be vigilant, something I would imagine my grandmother wasn’t.

Whether you weather the weather

Whether you weather the weather

I am obsessed with the weather. It controls all that can or can’t happen on the farm and the margins are incredibly delicate. If the weather is cooperative and you time your actions just right, you can save yourself a ton of work. However, if you miss a detail in the forecast or the forecast is wrong or changes suddenly, bad things can happen. Such a fine line it is.

Old Home Day reflection

Old Home Day reflection

It’s 5:30 a.m. on Sunday, Mother’s Day, at the old Baptist Church in East Charlotte. The wide-pine floorboards creak and crack as I retrieve my second cup of coffee. The stained glass windows glow with references to the Greek alphabet in mottled yellows, greens and blues. A few early birds are running laps from the newly pruned apple trees to the feeders. My fiancée, the lovely Britta Johnson, rightly asks what I’m doing up so early. 

Grafton, Wolitzer and Tolstoy:  Springtime suggestions for reading and listening

Grafton, Wolitzer and Tolstoy: Springtime suggestions for reading and listening

“For the record, my name is Kinsey Millhone. I’m a private investigator, licensed by the State of California, (now) thirty-three years old, 118 pounds of female in a five-foot-six-inch frame. My hair is dark, thick, and straight. I’d been accustomed to wearing it short, but I’d been letting it grow out just to see what it would look like. My usual practice is to crop my own mop every six weeks or so with a pair of nail scissors. This I do because I’m too cheap to pay twenty-eight bucks in a beauty salon.