Posts filed under: Local History

It is not often a minor town can claim as a major icon a person who obtained his or her first step on the path to national notoriety in Charlotte....
“When I was old enough I was sent to the village school, which was taught by an old-time Irish ‘master’ (Mr. McNanly) … who, holding that to spare the rod...
The 1.5-mile-long peninsula now known as Thompson’s Point is a valuable town-owned asset, but it has not always been so....
Early in the history of Vermont, people placed a high value on education and developed an organization around one of the basic tenets of Vermont independence: local control....
As Charlotte became established, it made sense to divide the town into several school districts, each with its own school building, at a time when transportation around town most often...
Charlotte Grange: honoring Charlotte’s agricultural roots and helping to build a resilient future for all...
The first permanent settlers came to Charlotte in 1784, and the town, once established, grew quickly....
Charlotte Grange: Our Values and Vision - Welcome to our new monthly column.  We hope you will enjoy learning more about the Charlotte Grange and how it is building on...
Two journalists from The Burlington Weekly Free Press traveled to Rutland in January 1847 to report on the new railroad’s stockholders meeting and spent two days bumping and lurching in...
Burlington Free Press, August 8, 1905 -  A horrible accident occurred here this afternoon… [Frank W. Weston and his son, Leslie Earl Weston] were driving from the north,...
In 1863, Rev. Bernice Darwin Ames wrote Charlotte’s history for Abby Hemenway’s Vermont Historical Gazetteer. “Hon. John A. Kasson is one of the most distinguished men Charlotte has produced....
No person should be restricted or defined by disabilities. Society seems to have few expectations of people with disabilities such as deafness, perhaps ascribing a lack of ability to overcome...
Cyrus Prindle was born in Charlotte on May 6, 1838, son of George and Louisa (Harris) Prindle. His father died on Cyrus’s fifth birthday May 6, 1843, aged 34 years....
Charmingly diverse collection brings rich history to life. It’s a heavy, round black iron ball, about the size of an orange. The ball sits silent and unmoving on the glass...
The Charlotte Grange Hall marked its 150th anniversary this year. Of course, no celebrations were possible, as the Hall has been closed since March. The last event held was a...
I’ve been driving by the old dairy barn on Mount Philo Road for 22 years—you know the one, a couple of miles north of Charlotte Central School. When I lived...
With this issue we celebrate the 60th anniversary of the News. The very first issue of the paper was printed on July 18, 1958, so technically we have turned 60,...
Last July, at the beginning of the yearlong countdown to this 60th anniversary of The Charlotte News, I wrote about how the paper was started because of my horse, Sox....
I graduated from Binghamton North High School in January 1960 and needed a job to carry me over to the fall when I would go off to college. My next-door...
Armistice Day became a national holiday in 1926. The idealistic notion of the end of war was itself shattered by subsequent conflicts. In 1947, WWII veterans sought to honor those...