Lindsay Longe

Sue Morse, now Keeping Track’s science director and a well-published author, will share stunning images from extensive travel throughout the Arctic and captivating stories about plants and animals in their northern habitats. Courtesy photo.

The Charlotte Land Trust will host a public talk by Sue Morse at 7:00 p.m. at the Charlotte Senior Center on March 29. Morse is a highly regarded expert in natural history and wildlife tracking. For nearly 40 years she has been monitoring wildlife—their whereabouts and habitat needs. Of particular interest to her is the bobcat, black bear, Canada lynx and cougar, all of which she photographs extensively.

Morse founded Keeping Track, a nonprofit, in 1994 because of her concern that many forms of development often unknowingly harm, isolate and even eliminate habitat critical to local biodiversity and broad-scale ecological health. Furthermore, she believed that many of those in charge of protecting our natural resources lack the tools and knowledge to track the threatened animals and their habitats. Keeping Track aims to educate the community and conserve an appropriate matrix of core and connective habitats.

Next week Morse, now Keeping Track’s science director and a well-published author, will present what we expect will be a fascinating show. She will share stunning images from her extensive travel throughout the Arctic and captivating stories about plants and animals in their northern habitats. She is a researcher, mentor and photographer whose talk, titled “Animals of the North: What Will Global Climate Change Mean for Them?” is appropriate for audiences of all ages.

She will discuss how northern wildlife species are currently being affected by climate change and what lies ahead. Canada lynx, moose, American marten, caribou, polar bear, Arctic fox and Arctic marine mammals and waterfowl are some of the species covered in this beautiful show. Morse promises to inspire guests, young and old, to think about the importance of conserving lands and natural resources.

The event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served courtesy of Charlotte Land Trust board members. For more information about Keeping Track visit their website. For questions about this event, contact Frances Foster of the Charlotte Land Trust.