Posts filed under: Into The Woods

Whether you realize it or not, the lives of Vermonters are massively enriched by forests, both aesthetically (we are the Green Mountain State, after all, and the green on the...
In 2008, Audubon Vermont and the Vermont Department of Forests, Parks and Recreation teamed up to create a program called “Foresters for the Birds....
Yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis) is a striking tree: golden, metallic bark shines among the grays and browns of other trees. The cousin of our most-identifiable tree, the white or “paper”...
A keystone species is a species, usually of wildlife, that has a disproportionate effect on its environment. In our region, the classic example of this is the beaver. Beavers dam and...
On February 6, The Charlotte News published an article by Chittenden County Forester Ethan Tapper on wolf trees. Tapper defines a wolf tree as one that grows in an open...
In Vermont, we’re “Forest Strong.” Our 75% forested landscape constantly endows us with gifts: clean air, clean water, wildlife habitat and carbon sequestration and storage, to name a few. It...
If you’ve ever walked in Vermont’s woods, chances are that you’ve stumbled upon a “wolf tree.” These giants of the forest are hard to miss; massive, gnarled trees with huge...
The 864-acre Hinesburg Town Forest (HTF) is many things. It is a historically important property, one of Vermont’s early town forests, listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It...
Eastern white pine (Pinus strobus) is perhaps New England’s most celebrated tree. It graces Vermont’s state seal and is the state tree of Maine (its cone is Maine’s state “flower”)...
Some would argue that as a forester, it’s my job to manage trees. However, I think that the forest, the whole system, is a forester’s true responsibility. Forests include trees...
While many forest landowners and managers are superheroes in their own right, working tirelessly to protect and support healthy forests, a few forest stewards have a special super-power, one that,...
If you’ve been walking through the woods this late summer, you’ve probably noticed acorns in the treetops, hanging from low branches, littering the ground. Acorns, the fruit of oak trees,...
As the effects of climate change on our world become more and more apparent, it is increasingly important to manage our forests to not just withstand these impacts, but to...
It is difficult for many people to distinguish between sugar maple (Acer saccharum) and red maple (Acer rubrum). The bark and leaves of these two trees have stumped plenty of...
As I’ve alluded to in other columns, I consider forest fragmentation to be one of the biggest threats to our forests. Forest fragmentation is the process by which large areas...
As many Vermonters know, prior to European settlement Vermont was almost completely forested. In the 1800s about 80 percent of the state was clearcut, largely to create sheep pasture. Many...
I often visit woodlots where it’s clear that some active management, often through the strategic harvesting of trees, would benefit the health and resilience of the forest, the quality of...
Somewhere encoded into our DNA is an appreciation for forests with evenly spaced, uniformly sized trees and a completely bare understory. If you identify with that idyllic vision, you’re not...
If you research early logging practices in New England, you’ll find a lot of amazing stories. In the times before the chainsaw and the skidder, loggers headed into the woods...
Believe it or not, every big tree was once a little tree and, before that, a seed. Yes, those massive trunks and branches that took decades or centuries to grow...